Care Seeker Resources

A collection of resources to help you navigate the care continuum.

By: Stephanie Jackson  |  Type: Press Release  |  On: November 15, 2016

Carelike, LLC. leads change in senior care referral industry

Carelike differentiates from its competitors by giving care seekers access and transparency to all providers in their area, not just those who pay for a profile. Carelike displays all available information, truly giving families the power of choice and the ability to make informed decisions.

Carelike, LLC. leads change in senior care referral industry

Media contact:
Stephanie F. Jackson
Carelike, LLC.
Tele: (404) 250-8370

ATLANTA, GA. (November 15, 2016) -- As many Americans (especially baby boomers) are discovering, finding the perfect care service for a senior loved one is challenging. Per data from a 2015 AARP report, approximately 43.5 million adults provided unpaid elder care, mainly to relatives. This number only stands to grow as baby boomers age, and Carelike has come up with a solution.

With most senior-placement companies, care seekers use online or call-in services to find an assisted living community or home health aide for their loved one. However, they only get information from a small, select number of providers who have a contract to be listed on that referral company's website. This means care seekers miss out on many providers who might more closely fit their needs, have more esteemed credentials or elicited better patient reviews.

The senior care referral industry has been around for years, and so has Carelike (previously SNAPforSeniors). The organization is well-connected and has the experience and expertise required to drive a much-needed change to the industry. Their business model has always put the care-seeker first. Everyone who is a licensed senior care professional - not just those who "pay to play" - shows up in Carelike's comprehensive database of providers. This is because Carelike pulls from 400 different sources to gather data on senior and post-acute care providers. The organization then goes to great lengths to clean, filter and augment the data to give care seekers the most up-to-date and accurate picture of each provider.

This methodology has made Carelike the preferred partner for organizations who help consumers find care, which include renowned health organizations, health insurance companies, care management companies, EAPs and patient advocacy groups, including the Alzheimer's Association.

If you haven't heard of Carelike, it may be because the company has always worked behind the scenes providing well-known, reputable organizations with data. Now that this company aims to appeal to consumer care seekers, Carelike will share providers' information with not only organizations who license the data but with family members looking for senior services through their new consumer search site.

Carelike is the only online senior listing company that provides that type of exposure for providers - to both consumers and professional care-seekers at organizations who license the data. Meanwhile, Carelike differentiates from its competitors by giving care seekers access and transparency to all providers in their area, not just those who pay for a profile. Carelike displays all available information, truly giving families the power of choice and the ability to make informed decisions. Discover the possibilities for yourself at CareLike.com.

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By: Carelike Team  |  Type: Article  |  On: August 10, 2016

Home safety checklist for seniors

Your home is your safe haven, but for seniors, a house can all too easily turn into a maze of hazards. Fall-proof the space with these tips.

Your home is your safe haven, but for seniors, a house can too easily turn into a maze of hazards. In fact, according to the National Institute of Health, 60 percent of falls occur at home, but these incidents may be preventable. If you're caring for an aging parent, there are steps you can take to create a sound living environment for your loved one. Use this checklist as your guide for making modifications for a happier, healthier home:

Ensure home has adequate lighting
No matter how good your eyesight is, maneuvering in the dark is next to impossible. Keep the senior safe by equipping the home with adequate lighting. Go around the house and check for burned-out bulbs and replace them as necessary.

Additionally, consider the overall lighting structure. Walk through the house at night with the lights on, and see where the home could use some brightness. Perhaps one hallways is particularly dark, or you have to walk upstairs before being able to turn on the second-level light. In this case, you might benefit from bringing in an electrician who can install light fixtures in these spaces.

 

Hand holding onto bathtub grab bar.

Install grab bars to promote safety at home.

Fall-proof the bathroom
The bathroom is one of the most common places for falls due to activities like climbing in and out of a tub and stepping on wet surfaces. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the older someone is when they slip in this room, the greater their risk for injury.

It only takes a few modifications to make the bathroom a little safer. Consumer Affairs advised installing grab bars near the tub and toilet. Remember, towel racks are not a replacement for grab bars, as they are not as sturdy and could easily dislodge from the wall under a person's weight.

To prevent falls in the shower itself, use non-slip bath mats or considering placing a shower chair in the tub. The latter option is especially beneficial for seniors who have trouble balancing.

Clean up
This simple task holds a lot of importance. Straightening up a home by clearing clutter, tucking away electrical cords and bringing stools back next to the table they belong to can go a long way in reducing the risk of tripping. The National Safety Council also advised wiping up spills as soon as they occur to prevent the senior from slipping on a wet surface.

Throw rugs are also a common cause for falls, as seniors may trip over their raised edges. Make sure rugs stay flat to the ground, or get rid of them altogether. You can certainly make someone feel accepted in your home without a welcome mat!

Some seniors may need assistance with daily living tasks to stay safe at home, even with these modifications. In this case, considering hiring a home health aide who can assist with bathing, dressing, eating and other duties.

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By: Carelike Team  |  Type: Article  |  On: July 19, 2016

3 ways seniors can save on healthcare

Saving money is an integral part of enjoying a comfortable lifestyle, but many seniors in retirement have gone far too long without doing this.

Saving money is an integral part of enjoying a comfortable lifestyle, but many seniors in retirement have gone far too long without doing this. In fact, this financial issue has become somewhat of a crisis in the U.S. According to a report from the National Institute on Retirement Security, the median savings for older adults on the cusp of retirement is only $12,000.

For those who haven't put away enough quite yet, there are still ways to get by later in life. This is even true when it comes to healthcare, which often comes with a hefty price tag. Check out these three money-saving tips for seniors:

1. Pick the right prescription drugs and pharmacy
You shouldn't have to choose between your medications and a meal, but for many seniors, that's a decision they face on a regular basis. According to a study published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, 8 percent of older adults without any prescription drug coverage will skip doses or come off entirely. This, of course, can have serious ramifications for one's well-being.

Beyond reviewing your health insurance options, you can also use certain strategies to save on medications. For one, always opt for generic versions of drugs when possible. Making this simple request with your doctor can significantly cut healthcare costs. A report published by the Generic Pharmaceutical Association found that this alternative approach resulted in $92 billion in savings for seniors in 2014 alone.

Additionally, as you might have already discovered, the cost for prescriptions varies between pharmacies. This is due to differences in businesses expenses, like overhead costs and profit margins. To find the best deal, shop around at both your privately-owned local pharmacies and retail chains.

Doctor about to inject senior with flu vaccine.Get flu shots for free.

2. Know what you can get for free
You don't have to pay a single dime for certain components of your wellness plan. For example, did you know many preventative services are free with Medicare Part B? This includes some vaccines, like the flu, hepatitis and pneumococcal shots, in addition to various screenings such as those for cardiovascular disease and lung cancer.

Certainly, a free flu shot is cheaper than getting sick and paying for doctor's visits and hospital stays. In fact, a 2010 study published in the journal Health Affairs found that the increased use of preventative services in the U.S. can lead to an annual average savings of $3.7 billion!

"Preventative services can save $3.7 billion annually!"

3. Consider aging in place
Many seniors require long-term care, and there are plenty of options at their disposal. Those looking to remain cost-efficient might consider "aging in place," a phrase used to describe when older adults utilize home health services instead of assisted living communities. Not only does this allow you to remain in the comfort of your own house, but it can also save you a lot of money.

A semi-private room in a long-term care facility costs a monthly average of $6,235 while home health aides charge about $21 per hour, according to U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Calling on these home health professionals for even eight hours each day would still cost less per month than seeking care elsewhere.

In addition to coming up with a wellness strategy that doesn't cause pain for your wallet, be frugal in all areas of life. That is, stick to a budget and cut out unnecessary expenditures to ensure you always have enough money to take care of your health.

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By: Carelike Team  |  Type: Blog  |  On: June 30, 2016

5 signs it’s time to move your senior parent to assisted living

There may never be one defining event that alerts you to schedule a tour of an assisted living community, but there are often more subtle signs that can let you know you're heading in that direction.

In life, there really is no "ideal" time for what matters most. Whether you're trying to find the perfect moment to get married, have kids, relocate or switch jobs, there won't be some ringing alarm clock letting you know when to make your move.

The same concept applies to determining when to move a senior parent to assisted living. There may never be one defining event that alerts you to schedule a tour of the surrounding senior communities, but there are signs that can let you know you're heading in that direction. Here are a few to watch out for:

1. Your senior parent needs assistance with daily activities
If you've gone to your parent's house and realized he or she is still wearing pajamas at 4 o'clock in the afternoon, this is an indication that the senior needs help with daily living activities. As the National Institutes of Health explained, assisted living communities help residents with tasks like dressing, eating and bathing. However, the seniors still maintain some level of independence.

While wearing the same outfit twice in row isn't the end of the world, this habit has implications for the senior's hygiene and overall well-being. You want to ensure your parent has fresh clothes and bathes regularly to remain healthy. Additionally, being provided with monitored meals may allow your parent to eat more nutritional foods. According to the NIH, a well-balanced diet can help seniors stave off conditions like Type 2 diabetes, anemia, heart disease and bone loss.

"Falling is the No. 1 cause of traumatic brain injuries in seniors."

2. Your loved one has fallen
When kids fall, they may end up with scraped knees, but they can usually hop right back up. Older adults can't recovery quite as quickly, and taking a tumble comes with serious risks. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a serious injury, like head trauma, will occur in 1 in 5 senior falls. In fact, falling is the No. 1 cause of traumatic brain injuries in adults age 65 and older.

Falling doesn't only cause problems for a senior's well-being; it can also inhibit his or her lifestyle. As the CDC noted, older adults may be afraid to fall again, so they avoid remaining active, which can lead to further health decline.

Assisted living communities are built with seniors in mind. That means there will be less of a risk for tripping over clutter in the hallway, and bathrooms are often equipped with railings. Not only might this help prevent the issue from recurring, but it can also offer peace of mind. You certainly don't want your parent sitting inside all day out of fear of getting injured.

3. You've noticed the older adult may need memory care
Many assisted living communities offer memory care, which can be beneficial for seniors experiencing cognitive decline. Remember, serious forgetfulness is not a normal part of aging. That is, leaving their phone at home while running to the grocery might not be cause for concern for older adults, but repeatedly asking the same questions or inability to focus generally raise red flags.

Assisted living communities are beneficial because they can prevent the dangerous repercussions of some of dementia's side effects. For example, those with this condition may wander. The Alzheimer's Association advised families of at-risk individuals to keep a close eye on the senior or put devices on the doors that alert you when they are opened. Assisted living communities can provide both supervision and security.

 

Senior couple eating salads outside assisted living community.

Assisted living communities give seniors more opportunities to socialize.

4. The older adult wants more social opportunities
One of the greatest perks for residents of assisted living communities is the opportunity to socialize. Often, seniors at home are limited to whom they can interact with - perhaps a few friendly neighbors if they're lucky. Assisted living communities, on the other hand, organize exercise classes, outings and community events in addition to supplying a space for residents to hang out.

Spending time with friends and participating in fun activities don't just enhance a senior's quality of life but can also protect their well-being. According to the University of Rochester Medical School, staying social may reduce older adults' risk for heart disease, osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis and some cancers.

5. You've become stressed as the caregiver
Your well-being is important, and being a stressed-out caregiver isn't doing your loved one any favors. You might have hesitations about putting your parent in an assisted living community. However, it's important to look at the big picture of the situation. Consider all the benefits your loved one gains by moving and how your family dynamic will change for the better.

You love your parent and want the best for him or her, and keeping all your options open will help you do just that. Assisted living communities provide the perfect balance of care and independence.

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By: Carelike Team  |  Type: Blog  |  On: June 22, 2016

Short-distance Caregiving Plan

Caregivers, if you live a short distance away from the person in your care and not under the same roof, it can be difficult to know exactly what you need to do and when to do it. You may also be confronted with resistance to your help by the person in your care.

Caregivers, if you live a short distance away from the person in your care and not under the same roof, it can be difficult to know exactly what you need to do and when to do it. You may also be confronted with resistance to your help by the person in your care.

To be sure you’re doing everything that person needs, take a moment to create a plan that will help both of you.

Appreciate.

Chances are the person in your care is someone you dearly love, and it’s easy to overlook that fact when you’re rushing around perhaps stopping by after work or in between picking up the kids from school and getting them to music lessons to practice. Make the most of your visits by going beyond just dropping in from time to time.  Instead, sit down and visit with them. Tell them how much you appreciate what they’ve done for you in the past. Describe events and moments where you felt your cup overflowing with their love. This exercise will be a reminder to you of the person he or she once was and, despite their situation, still is.

Talk.

Be sure you have frequent conversations with the person in your care about what’s going on with them. Have there been any changes in their level of pain, emotional stability and medications? Ask them how these things are affecting them. Discuss options for easing pain, whether more frequent visits will help with emotional stability, or whether medication adjustments are necessary. If you find yourself arguing because they are resisting your suggestions, validate their feelings. Tell them that you understand how difficult their situation must be. Ask them what they think will help.

While you’re at it, talk about what’s going on with you. Let them know how you’re feeling both physically and emotionally. You’d be surprised at how much they care about you and welcome the opportunity to help ease some of your burdens.

Observe.

Pay close attention to changes in the person in your care. Pick one day a week and write down your observations in a journal so that from week to week you can compare your notes to alert you to subtle changes that are occurring. Is it taking longer to eat, dress, or walk from one room to the other? Are they eating well? Is their hearing diminishing?  Are they showing signs of memory loss?

Act.

If you determine the person in your care needs more help, make arrangements. Schedule doctor visits to address medical and emotional issues. Readjust your schedule or enlist the help of others to spend more time with them. Line up meal deliveries, visiting pets for “fur” therapy, physical therapy/massage appointments and visits by relatives and friends.

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By: Carelike Team  |  Type: Article  |  On: May 13, 2016

What to expect when your senior parent has Alzheimer’s disease

Learn more about what you can expect if your senior parent was recently diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease.

Having older parents means your family's life is full of changes. From shifting dynamics of responsibility to relocating homes, transition simply comes with time, and health is no exception. Alzheimer's disease, a condition marked by memory and thinking impairments, predominantly affects seniors. According to the Alzheimer's Foundation of America, approximately 5.1 million Americans have this disease, and a person's risk increases with age. If a doctor has diagnosed your loved one with Alzheimer's disease, here's what you can expect:

You'll see more changes down the road
As the Alzheimer's Association explained, this condition is progressive, meaning it gets worse with time. How quickly this occurs varies on an individual basis. Post-diagnosis life spans range anywhere from four to 20 years, which creates a lot of uncertainty. Your parent's doctor can provide more insight into his or her unique condition.

Your parent's memory won't be what it once was
According to the Mayo Clinic, those with mild dementia as a result of Alzheimer's disease often forget things they just learned. For example, your loved one may repeat questions because he or she forgot your original answer. Memory gaps may also cause the senior to lose things - you may spend a few extra minutes looking for his or her wallet before leaving the house, or you'll find the TV remote in another room.

You know how frustrating it is to misplace something, so it's important to remain patient and help the senior search for lost items. Additionally, when it's especially important they remember information - like details from a doctor - ask if you can accompany your parent to the appointment so that you can take notes.

 

Senior man with dementia on blue background.Help your senior parent by showing love and support.

Home management will become more challenging
In addition to memory loss, dementia can also lead to poor decision making. As Reader's Digest explained, the cognitive decline can make it difficult for your parent to manage his or her finances and pay bills. You certainly wouldn't want to see your loved one's water or electricity turned off because of a missed payment, so consider lending a hand with these tasks.

Day-to-day duties may also become more difficult. For instance, your parent may select a winter coat to wear when it's 80 degrees outsides. In these cases, you may benefit from hiring a home health aide to assist with responsibilities like dressing and running errands. Even if the senior can still care for him or herself with eating and bathing, for instance, you can hire someone to drive your parent places, pick up groceries or let the dog out, among other tasks.

Seniors may forget to pick up milk at the grocery store or to return your phone call, but serious memory problems are not a normal part of aging. If you suspect your older loved one has dementia, speak with his or her doctor. Additionally, remember that an Alzheimer's disease diagnosis is an adjustment for everyone. Your parent is likely going through an array of emotions knowing he or she has this condition, and it's important to show love and support.

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By: Carelike Team  |  Type: Blog  |  On: May 03, 2016

Absentee Voting for Caregivers

As a caregiver, you and the person in your care may not be able or have the time to spend hours in line. See whether you are eligible to vote early or by absentee ballot.

Caregivers, we’re over halfway through the primary season for the 2016 election, and casting your vote in the general election is, of course, very important.

With so much at stake, predictions are that voter turnout will be enormous on Election Day. As a caregiver, you and the person in your care may not be able or have the time to spend hours in line. Some states provide early voting at the polls (which can sometimes mean long lines as well). In many states you might be able to apply for an absentee ballot for yourself and the person in your care.

Each state and the District of Columbia have different rules and regulations about early or absentee voting. To see whether you are eligible to vote early or by absentee ballot:

  • Click here
  • Scroll to the bottom of the page and select your state or District of Columbia
  • Scroll down to #4 and open link for application

For your loved ones who reside in independent living, assisted care or a skilled nursing home, ask the administrator to set up an absentee voter application event.  Your local government or the League of Women Voters are often willing to help with such events.

Fill out your absentee voter application now so you don’t lose out on exercising your right to vote for our next president.

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By: Carelike Team  |  Type: Article  |  On: April 21, 2016

5 interview questions to ask a home health aide

If you're seeking a home health aide for your parent, finding the professionals through a reputable source is the first step to ensuring you have a reliable caretaker.

Many seniors choose to age in place, meaning they'd rather stay in their homes than an assisted living community. While either route can lead to a fulfilling retirement lifestyle, each involve different care professionals. For older adults who want to stay put, they may need to hire a home health aide.

If you're seeking a home health aide for your parent, finding the professionals through a reputable source is the first step to ensuring you have a reliable caretaker. However, you'll still want to conduct an interview to ensure he or she is the right fit. Here are a few questions to ask during this screening:

"Make sure working with senior clients is not a totally new experience."

1. Have you ever worked with a senior?
According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, home health aides work with various clients, such as those with physical disabilities or cognitive impairment. To be sure, a diverse background demonstrates the individual's willingness to accept change and the ability to adapt to different work environments. However, you want to make sure that working with senior clients is not a totally new experience for this person, especially if your loved one has unique care needs like dementia.

Additionally, ask about what specific conditions the candidates have experience with, and get their perspective on the relationships they've built with former clients. These home health aides will be in your parent's living space and serve an integral part of his or her lifestyle, so you want to ensure these health care professionals demonstrate compassion and interest in the senior's needs.

2. What services could you provide in an emergency?
Whether in relation to your parent's health or a natural disasters, emergencies are unpredictable but often inevitable. The home health aide must be prepared to handle these situations appropriately. Does he or she know CPR? What steps would he or she take if the senior was unresponsive? The Mayo Clinic also advised you ask how will the individual will assist your parent in a power outage.

3. Why are you a home health aide?
Ideal candidates would answer that they enjoy the compassion and nurturing aspect as well as the medical technique required for the job. This way, you'll know they care about developing their skills and providing high-quality care, giving your parent the best experience possible.

4. Which part of the job description do you see as the biggest challenge?
Candidates won't want to disclose that they are uncomfortable about certain components of the job, but no one enters a new endeavor without some level of apprehension. Phrasing the question this way puts a positive spin on the query and may make the home health aide more inclined to share an honest response.

At the same time, don't get discouraged upon discovering the home health aide is nervous about something. Find out how the person has handled other challenges in his or her career path, and discuss how he or she could apply those skills to new tasks.

5. Do you have any questions?
If a candidate has queries of his or her own, this has two benefits. First, it shows initiative and creativity. You want a home health aide who is self-motivated, as he or she will likely be working independently. Additionally, it creates an opportunity to bring up any issues you hadn't considered.

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By: Carelike Team  |  Type: Blog  |  On: April 18, 2016

A Caregiver Plan for Taking a Vacation

Caregivers, springtime is the best time to start planning for a summer vacation. Before you decide well-deserved time off is out of your reach, we have some tips that might just change your mind.

Caregivers, springtime is the best time to start planning for a summer vacation. Before you decide well-deserved time off is out of your reach, we have some tips that might just change your mind.

As with anything you do for the person in your care, knowing what you need and having a plan to achieve your goals is essential.

 

If you cannot take the person in your care with you on vacation:

1.      Investigate respite care opportunities

  • Most assisted living communities and skilled nursing homes offer respite care, but they may have some restrictions.
  • Care providers are not necessarily willing to schedule respite care three or four months in advance. But don’t let that deter you from researching places now. Carelike’s search engine will help you find the right kind of care you will need.   You can begin your search here.
  • Schedule appointments with three or four providers so that you can find the best places to line up the future care you will need. A couple of weeks before your planned vacation, discuss availability with each provider on your list to see if they have an opening.
  • Make doctor appoints during the next couple of months to ensure that all records are up-to-date, including vaccines and medications.

2.      Find in-home care

  • Springtime is the best time to line up in-home care for when you plan to be away. Plan for it now and engage the in-home care to tend to the person in your care a couple of hours or days per week leading up to your departure date so that the person in your care and the provider will have plenty of time to get to know one another. Enjoy the free time in-home care provides during this time.
  • There are thousands of in-home care providers throughout the country, and Carelike’s search engine can also help you find quality in-home care in your area.  You can begin your search here.

 

If you plan to take vacation with the person in your care:

1.      Make sure the airline and airport will work with you          

  • Arrange ahead of time with your carrier and the airport. It’s best to make reservations by phone so that you can advise the carrier of your needs (including oxygen, wheelchair, dietary restrictions and any other special requirements you have). Discuss their procedures, including how far ahead you can board the plane and reserve a seat for yourself and the person in your care that will be most convenient for you.
  • Be sure to ask whether the airline offers a rate discount for you and the person in your care.
  • Ask the airline representative for a number at both airports that you can call to discuss your needs and their procedures with you. Call the airports when you make your reservations.
  • A couple of days before both your outbound and return flights, call the airline and the airports to go over all of your concerns.

2.      Plan your trip by train

  • Call Amtrak rather than making reservations online so that you are sure to cover all of your concerns.
  • Follow the same guidelines as you would for travelling by air, and ask for the numbers for both train stations’ representatives.

3.      Travel to your destination by car

  • If you’re going to be driving your own car, schedule a maintenance checkup for your car a week before you plan to drive off to paradise.
  • You might consider renting a vehicle. If you need extra room for a wheelchair or walker, be sure to reserve a car which has the extra-needed room.
  • If you decide to rent a van or SUV, and the person in your care will need help climbing in or out of it, a collapsible step stool will come in very handy.
  • Pack or refresh the First Aid Kit for your car.

 

These are the tips we have that are relevant to travelling with the person in your care or for making arrangements for them to stay at home. Don’t stop here. Read our blogs that go into more specific tips including what to pack and where to stay:

Air Travel Tips for Caregivers

Staying in Hotels

What are you waiting for? Start planning your well-deserved vacation now!

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By: Carelike Team  |  Type: Blog  |  On: March 11, 2016

Putting Together a “Caregiver Plan”

While we cannot predict the future, having a comprehensive plan for taking care of a loved one when they no longer are capable of doing everything for themselves will make transitions much smoother. It's also important and never too early to create a plan for your own future care needs.

At some point in our lives, we have either heard or said the following about getting old or having our health fail:

  • “Should anything happen to me, I don’t want to be a burden on my children.”
  • “That will be ‘the day’ when I can’t take care of myself.”
  • “I will never put my loved one in a ‘home.’”

The problem with each of these statements is that they are not specific enough in carrying out a plan that encompasses all aspects of aging and caring for a loved one as their needs increase. And while we cannot predict the future, having a comprehensive plan for taking care of a loved one when they no longer are capable of doing everything for themselves will make the transition much smoother.

If you are already taking care of someone, it’s not necessarily too late to create a caregiver plan with and for him or her; it’s also definitely not too early to create a plan for your own future care needs.

Prepare to have the conversation.

Discussing the subject of “what ifs” can be difficult at best – most of us don’t want to think about being dependent on someone else – but if you prepare ahead of time to have the conversation, you will be in a better position to create a plan that works for everyone.

  • Think about positive ways you can broach the subject:
    • Negative: Since you’re not getting any younger, you’ll need my help.
    • Positive: I want to be sure I’m doing everything I can to help you.
    • Negative: When I can’t take care of myself, I expect you to help me.
    • Positive: There may come a time when I will need your help.Do your homework and create a list of what you anticipate will need to be done.

Do your homework and create a list of what you anticipate will need to be done.

  • Try not to be swayed by the fact that you cannot predict the future. You can certainly predict that there will come a time when bill paying, medication management, transportation, home maintenance and health concerns will need to be monitored by someone else.
  • Whether you’re the person who will need help or the person who will be overseeing the help your loved one will need, think about who you know has the time, talent and experience to take over these tasks.

Meet with everyone who you will ask to participate.

  • Separate meetings might be helpful for you to introduce your plan and give everyone an opportunity to buy into the plan and add valuable suggestions to ensure the plan is a comprehensive as possible.
  • Once you’re ready, call a meeting with everyone at the same time to go over the draft plan. Be sure to explain it is a draft plan and the discussion should be focused on whether everyone who will be involved is comfortable with the responsibilities they will be or have been assigned.
  • When the meeting is over, your plan will still be a “draft” plan based on the fact that you truly cannot predict the future. As your loved one’s situation changes, you and everyone involved will need to reassess and adjust the plan so that all of you will have clear understandings of what is expected.

Don’t wait for a crisis or for when “the day has come” to know how you and everyone concerned will know your wishes or can pitch in to help – create your draft caregiver plan now.

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